Curry Parker’s great dryland yields lead to Peanut Efficiency Award

Curry Parker likes his body whole, but if he had to choose, he’d rather lose an arm than an eye. But either way, he’d want the removing procedure done correctly and on time.

Curry Parker likes his body whole, but if he had to choose, he’d rather lose an arm than an eye. But either way, he’d want the removing procedure done correctly and on time.

“I’m hands-on 100 percent. Seeing what’s going on in the field, seeing what needs fixing by just pulling up to a field, that comes from experience,” said Parker, who is 65 and farms in Headland, Ala. “I tell my wife I’d rather lose an arm than I would an eye because for me seeing what’s going on is the most important thing.”

As a predominately dryland farmer, a good set of eyes coupled with a sharpened sense of timing are the keys to success. From timely rainfall to timely disease control to timely planting to timely harvest and cleanup, he expects (requires) his crew to show up on the farm ready to work – and he expects them to show up on time. The benefit of being on time is taking advantage of every window of opportunity, either planned for or unplanned for, each season avails you.

For impressive dryland yields in 2016 and for, well, his timing, Parker is the 2017 Farm Press Peanut Efficiency Winner for the Lower Southeast.

A good-humored Christian man who is quick to smile and to tell a good story, Parker is proud of the family’s operation, which he took over from his father, Billy, another well-recognized peanut farmer in the area who passed away in 2003. His mother, Joy, passed in 2013.

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