Northeast Texas wheat is promising
Northeast Texas wheat is promising.

No predictions but good wheat crop likely

As Eric Williams waded into a chest-high stand of wheat on a sunny, late-April day, the full heads were just taking on the first hint of an amber hue and stirred by a gentle breeze they performed a whispery rustle sound that promises—maybe just hints at—an abundant harvest.

Williams suggested the field might average better than 40 bushels per acre.

He expects more, however. “I think wheat yields this year will please everyone,” he said. “Wheat looks pretty good.” He won’t predict how good he thinks the crop will be, displaying an almost universal farmer superstition of counting eggs too quickly and cognizant of the possibility of weather disasters that can wipe out even the best potential in a matter of minutes.

Williams, who farms near Aberfoyle,Texas, says growing conditions for most of the Northeast corner of the state “have been ideal from the time we planted. It grew off well and broke dormancy early.”