Icy wet weather in West Central Texas brought much fieldwork to a standstill but made for some great views

Icy, wet weather in West Central Texas brought much fieldwork to a standstill, but made for some great views.

Parts of Texas still very dry; other areas greening up

The rains have perked up winter pastures and given wheat and oat crops a boost across much of Texas.

The Texas terrain, at least across much of the state looks a lot different than it did this time last year.

Following a recent drive through Central Texas, Dr. Travis Miller [2] said he noticed a lot of green that wasn’t there this time last year.

“There are certainly still some severely dry areas in the state,” said Miller, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension agronomist and Texas A&M University soil and crop sciences associate department head, College Station. “But over the last month to 60 days, we’ve had significant rainfall in a lot of Texas, and it’s made a lot of difference.”

 

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The rains have perked up winter pastures and given wheat and oat crops a boost across much of the state [4], he said.

The raised soil-moisture reserves, though still low in some areas, are much improved, giving farmers optimism for next year’s plantings.

 

Also of interest on Southwest Farm Press:

Rainfall improves drought status [5]

Winter weather slows Rolling Plains cotton harvest [6]

A wheat and corn weather market [7]