From left Adam Hixson Adam Hixson BASF technical services representative Lubbock and Matt Matocha AgriLife Extension program specialistmdashweed science College Station teamed up to present ldquoCorn Herbicides Overlapping Residual Programs for Weed Resistancerdquo at the 2014 Crop Tour at the Texas AampM University field laboratory near College Station Texas AampM AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin

(From left) Adam Hixson, Adam Hixson, BASF technical services representative, Lubbock, and Matt Matocha, AgriLife Extension program specialist—weed science, College Station, teamed up to present “Corn Herbicides Overlapping Residual Programs for Weed Resistance” at the 2014 Crop Tour at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Blair Fannin)

Identification is first step in developing weed control program

  Understanding the weed population in a crop gives a producer information necessary to select the proper herbicide, the right rate and the correct application timing.  

Identifying weed species is the most important factor in developing an effective weed control program for corn and cotton crops.

Understanding the weed population in a crop gives a producer information necessary to select the proper herbicide, the right rate and the correct application timing, said Matt Matocha, AgriLife Extension program specialist—weed science, College Station.

A recent field day at the Texas A&M University field laboratory near College Station showcased the latest strategies in managing problem weeds in corn and cotton. The lab serves as a research and teaching platform for Texas A&M AgriLife.

The field day was sponsored by BASF Corp. and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

 

 

 

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