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Ethanol industry wants to be part of emission discussion

EPA Administration Scott Pruitt is rolling back emissions standards for cars and light trucks for model years 2022-2025.

EPA Administration Scott Pruitt is rolling back emissions standards for cars and light trucks for model years 2022-2025.

“The Obama Administration's determination was wrong,” Pruitt said. “Obama’s EPA cut the Midterm Evaluation process short with politically charged expediency, made assumptions about the standards that didn’t comport with reality, and set the standards too high.”

Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor says “high-octane fuels — such as ethanol blends like E25-E30 — should be part of this discussion.”

“We have provided a wealth of data to show that midlevel ethanol blends can be used by automakers to produce smaller, more efficient engines that will help meet future vehicle standards,” Skor said. “We will continue to remain engaged with automakers and government stakeholders to ensure that biofuels are part of any long-term plan for engine efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction.” 

California waiver rexamined

Under the Clean Air Act, EPA sets national standards for vehicle tailpipe emissions of certain pollutants. Through a CAA waiver granted by EPA, California can impose stricter standards for vehicle emissions of certain pollutants than federal requirements. The California waiver is still being reexamined by EPA.

“EPA will set a national standard for greenhouse gas emissions that allows auto manufacturers to make cars that people both want and can afford — while still expanding environmental and safety benefits of newer cars. It is in America's best interest to have a national standard, and we look forward to partnering with all states, including California, as we work to finalize that standard,” Pruitt said.

Source: U.S. EPA, Growth Energy

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