Dr Ron Gill Texas AampM AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist and associate department head for animal science at Texas AampM University leads a cattle handling demonstration at the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Convention recently in Fort Worth

Dr. Ron Gill, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist and associate department head for animal science at Texas A&M University, leads a cattle handling demonstration at the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Convention recently in Fort Worth.

Cattle raisers convention discusses market outlook, water and border security

Overall, Texas cattle producers continue to slowly rebuild herds as parts of the state continue to deal with drought conditions.

Southwestern cattlemen had plenty to talk about during the annual Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association Convention held recently in Fort Worth.

Water, as usual, takes a top spot on any ag-related agenda. Border security and the cattle market also garnered plenty of attention at the three-day convention attended by 3,500 producers.

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Overall, Texas cattle producers continue to slowly rebuild herds as parts of the state continue to deal with drought conditions.

“I don’t think anybody is wholesale going out and buying bunches of cows and restocking,” said Dr. Joe Paschal, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist, Corpus Christi. Paschal gave a live demonstration on the function of a cow’s rumen during opening-day activities.

“What we’re seeing is when people normally in the past hold back 10 to 15 percent females as replacements, they are (now) holding back maybe 20 or 25 percent or they are going to buy some replacement females to fit that sort of bill,” Paschal said. “A guy that has 100 cows that is holding back 15 heifers… it doesn’t take long for that steady, slow incremental process to get us back (to larger inventory levels).”

For more on the annual convention, check out this report from Texas AgriLife.

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