Sorghum field ToppyBaker/ThinkstockPhotos

Sorghum producers say China's decision is win-win

China decides to terminate its anti-dumping and anti-subsidy probe into U.S. sorghum imports.

Sorghum producers are praising China’s decision to terminate its anti-dumping and anti-subsidy probe into U.S. sorghum imports. 

“National Sorghum Producers is gratified by this announcement and this quick result, which is a win for China and a win for America’s sorghum farmers,” said National Sorghum Producers Chairman Don Bloss, a sorghum producer from Pawnee City, Nebraska. 

The U.S. Grains Council agreed. 

"Today’s development is also a step in the right direction for U.S.-China trade relations, and we hope it is a platform for further lessening of tensions and challenges facing U.S. grains exports to China,” said U.S. Grains Council President and CEO Tom Sleight.

China launched the investigation in February, days after President Trump announced tariffs on imports of solar panels and washing machines. The $1 billion annual trade flow didn’t exist five years before. In 2013, China began buying U.S. sorghum as an alternate to corn. In April, it was reported that at least two ships loaded with sorghum changed course while sailing across the Indian Ocean bound for Shanghai.

Today’s announcement comes as China’s vice premier met in Washington with Trump administration officials.

"This is critical good news for U.S. sorghum producers and exporters, and U.S. agriculture as a whole,” Sleight said. “We are grateful for the intense efforts of the White House, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative and, particularly, the U.S. sorghum industry as these cases were considered.” 

Sleight is hopeful the sorghum announcement is the first of many positive announcements as the countries work through trade issues.

"Today’s development is also a step in the right direction for U.S.-China trade relations, and we hope it is a platform for further lessening of tensions and challenges facing U.S. grains exports to China."

Source: U.S. Grains Council, National Sorghum Producers

TAGS: Farm Policy
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